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Ice Cold Air ® Discount Auto Repair is your COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR solution. We are more than just Air Conditioning!
We offer total car care from repair services to maintenance services.

Click On Any of the Below Services to Learn More

 

 

 

 

REPAIR SERVICES

AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE

Your car’s heating, ventilating and air conditioning system (HVAC) keeps your car interior comfortable in any season by providing the right temperature and humidity level. The HVAC system also helps improve defroster operation.

Why Do I Need This Service?

Proper heating and cooling performance is critical for interior comfort and for safety reasons such as defrosting. The HVAC system will work as designed when you need it if you perform this service.

Typical Service

• A thorough inspection of your car’s HVAC system should be performed annually.

• A service technician checks pressures to test operation, refrigerant charge and outlet temperatures.

• If the system is found to be low on refrigerant, a leak test is performed to find the source of the leak.

• Refrigerant may be added if necessary to “top off” the system (some states do not allow “topping off”).

• A technician may also check for evidence of refrigerant cross-contamination, which is the mixing of refrigerants.

• A/C service should also include a check of the compressor’s drive belt and tension.

Questions to Ask

• What happens if I continue to use my car’s A/C system, even though it’s not cooling properly?

• Water drips underneath my car when I use the A/C system. Is this normal?

• A musty odor comes out of the A/C vents at times. Can anything be done about this?

• My car’s A/C system seems to cool intermittently and I hear a clicking on and off from underneath the hood. What does this mean?

Are you aware? Having your car’s HVAC system serviced regularly can help save you money on more expensive repairs.

Source– Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org

 

BRAKE SYSTEM

The brake system is your car’s most important safety system. Never put off routine brake inspections or any needed repair so that your car can continue to operate as designed.

What is it?

Your car’s brake system is its most critical safety system and you should check it immediately if you suspect any problems. A properly operating brake system helps ensure safe vehicle control and operation under a wide variety of conditions.

What does it do?

When you push the brake pedal, the force generates hydraulic pressure in the master cylinder. This pressure flows through the hydraulic lines and hoses to the wheel cylinders and calipers, forcing the shoes against the drums (drum brakes) and the pads against the rotors (disc brakes). The resulting friction slows the vehicle and is relative to the amount of force applied at the brake pedal.

Why Do I Need This Service?

Brakes are a normal wear item for any car. Eventually, they’re going to need to be replaced for both performance and safety reasons. Planning can also save you money – your brakes won’t get to the “metal-to-metal” point, which usually means accelerating expensive rotor or drum replacement.

Your car owner’s manual might specify periodic flushing and filling of the brake hydraulic system. Contaminated brake fluid may lead to erosion and other problems in the hydraulic system, especially on cars with antilock brakes (ABS).

Typical Wear and Tear

Brakes are a normal wear item for any car and eventually they’re going to need replacement. Avoid letting your brakes get to the “metal-to-metal” point, which usually means accelerating expensive rotor or drum replacement. Several factors that affect wear include:

• Driving habits

• Operating conditions

• Vehicle type

• The quality of brake lining material

Symptoms

• Car pulls to one side during braking

• Brake pedal pulsates when you apply the brakes

• Brake pedal feels “mushy”

• Noise when you step on the brake pedal

• Repeatedly need to add brake fluid to the master cylinder

Typical Service

• Have your brake linings, drums and rotors, and brake fluid inspected.

• It’s always best to be able to plan ahead for brake work by knowing the brake condition as your car ages.

• The typical “brake job” consists of brake pad and/or shoe replacement, along with related hardware. Depending on the condition or thickness of the drums or rotors, machining or replacement may be necessary.

• The parking brake should also be checked for proper operation and adjustment. In some cases, the parking brake shoes/pads may need replacement.

Questions to Ask

• Is there anything I can do to help the brakes on my car last longer?

• How does the work being performed eliminate the symptoms my car exhibited or my complaint?

• Are there any related services my car needs while this service is being performed?

• What does the brake warning light mean on my car’s dashboard?

Are you aware? Regular brake inspections are the best way to ensure safe and reliable braking and minimize the cost of repairs when brake service is needed.

Brake System Source– Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org/brakes

 

BATTERIES, STARTING AND CHARGING

What is it?

Your car’s starting and charging systems, and the battery help ensure dependable vehicle operation whenever you drive your car and in all sorts of driving conditions. Make sure to check these systems regularly.

What does it do?

The battery stores electrical energy and the starter converts that energy into mechanical force to turn the engine for starting. The alternator produces electric current to replace what the starter used during start-up and to support electrical loads when the engine is running. An ignition module turns the low-voltage supply to the ignition coil on and off, and the coil produces the high voltage for the ignition system. This creates a spark at the spark plugs and ignites the air/fuel mixture in the engine. A belt transmits power from the front of the engine to the alternator’s pulley, along with other accessories.

Typical Wear and Tear

Driving habits such as frequent engine on/off cycles will cause more wear on the starter than a simple trip back and forth to work. Other factors include:

• Driving and weather conditions

• Mileage

• Vehicle age

• Excessive electrical draws like in-vehicle entertainment systems

Symptoms

• Headlights and interior lights dim

• “Check Engine” and/or battery light may come on

• Accessories fail to operate

Batteries Source– Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org/battery_cables

 

CHECK ENGINE LIGHT

In 1996, an orange light on your car’s dashboard labeled “Check Engine” or “Service Engine Soon” became standard on all car makes and models. The light tells you there’s a problem with your car’s engine and powertrain control system.

Why Do I Need This Service?

An illuminated “Check Engine” or “Service Engine Soon” light indicates a problem detected by your car’s on-board diagnostic system (OBD). The light cannot indicate the exact nature of the problem – only the right training and diagnostic equipment can do that.

Typical Service

• A flashing light indicated a problem that is currently happening and may require immediate attention, whereas a steady light can be diagnosed at the first convenient opportunity.

• A technician connects a “scan tool” to your car’s onboard diagnostic system to determine the problem.

• Once the problem is pinpointed, repairs are made and the light is reset.

Questions to Ask

• Does the light mean my car needs a tune-up?

• When checking out the cause of the light, are there any other services that need to be performed at the same time?

• Is it normal for the light to come on briefly when I start my car?

• What happens if I just ignore the light?

• Will the light eventually turn off by itself?

• Will my car pass an emissions test if the light is on?

Are you aware? A loose gas cap can trigger the “Check Engine? or “Service Engine Soon” light. Make sure the cap is secure and tight.

Check Engine Light Source– Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org/check_engine_light
 

EMISSION SYSTEM

What is it?

Your car’s emission system keeps the engine running cleanly and efficiently in all sorts of operating conditions. If your car’s engine isn’t performing up to par or the “Check Engine” light goes on, have it inspected immediately. Failure to do so can reduce your mileage per gallon of fuel or cause your vehicle to pollute.

What does it do?

Your car’s emission system controls the emissions, exhaust and pollutants using an array of sensors, computerized engine controls and the exhaust components. The emission system substantially reduces harmful gases such as carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and prevents harmful gasoline vapors from escaping at the fuel tank.

Typical Wear and Tear

Some factors affecting the emission system include:

• Driving and atmospheric conditions

• Mileage

• Vehicle age

• Type of spark plug electrode material

• Maintenance history

• Poor spark

• Bad fuel

• Damaged or worn sensors

Source– Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org
 

ENGINE COOLING SYSTEM

What is it?

The engine cooling system affects your car’s overall dependability and engine longevity. Cooling systems have advanced over the years with new coolant formulations and new radiator designs and materials. If you suspect a problem with your cooling system, you should check it immediately.

What does it do?

The key parts of the cooling system remove heat from the engine and automatic transmission and dissipate heat to the air outside. The water pump circulates coolant through the engine. The coolant absorbs heat and returns it to the radiator where heat is dissipated. The thermostat regulates the coolant temperature to keep it consistent for efficient engine operation.

Typical Wear and Tear

Factors that affect the replacement of cooling system parts include:

• Driving habits

• Operating conditions

• Type of vehicle

• Type of coolant

• Frequency of regular maintenance such as coolant changes

Symptoms

• Overheating

• Sweet smell

• Leaks

• Repeatedly need to add fluid

Source– Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org
 

ENGINE REPLACEMENT

Rebuilt Engine

When a car or truck suffers major engine damage, the first reaction of most vehicle owners is to buy a new or used car or truck. This makes sense in some cases, but often, it isn’t necessary. Repowering your car or truck’s worn out engine with a rebuilt/remanufactured engine can also be considerably less expensive than buying a new or used car. A rebuilt engine is one that is remanufactured to prescribed standards and specifications by highly-skilled machinists using state-of-the-art equipment and components. During this process, many of the new components installed meet or exceed original equipment performance standards. Frequently, rebuilt engines are superior to new car engines because better parts are used, or design changes in parts correct problems with the original engine. Rebuilt/remanufactured engines are dependable, reliable and backed by warranty programs. A rebuilt engine gets better gas mileage than a worn-out engine and emits fewer pollutants. Engine repowering also saves energy related to processing discarded engines and cars. The savings from engine repowering is notable when compared to the prices of new cars and trucks. A rebuilt/ remanufactured engine purchased and installed at an average cost of $2500 – $3500 is a sound and attractive investment. Typically, a professionally rebuilt engine comes with a one-year or 12,000-mile warranty but some of these warranties can be as long as 36 months or 36,000 miles. Check with your local repair shop for information on their rebuilt engines and warranty programs.

Source– Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org
 

EXHAUST SYSTEM

What is it?

Your car’s exhaust system has come a long way from the old days of exhaust pipes and mufflers. Today, the exhaust system is safety and emissions control rolled into one. Have your car’s exhaust system inspected regularly and check it immediately if you suspect any problems.

What does it do?

The exhaust system routes dangerous exhaust gas from the engine out and away from the car to keep from affecting the occupants. Next, the exhaust system reduces exhaust noise from the engine. The catalytic converter reduces the level of harmful pollutants in the exhaust. Finally, the oxygen sensors mounted in the exhaust system monitor the level of exhaust gases to maintain efficient engine operation and to monitor the converter’s operation.

Typical Wear and Tear

Maintain a safe car with regular exhaust system checks. Factors that affect replacement requirements include:

• Driving habits (short trips take their toll on exhaust system life)

• Road conditions (salt, road spray, bumps)

• Vehicle type

• Age of exhaust system parts

Symptoms

• Loud noise

• Rattling noise when starting, accelerating or braking

• Drowsiness while driving

Exhaust Source – Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org/exhaust_system
 

STEERING AND SUSPENSION

What is it?

Like your car’s brake system, the steering and suspension systems are key safety-related systems. Together, they largely determine your car’s ride and handling. Have your car’s steering and suspension systems checked regularly, at least once a year and usually with a wheel alignment.

What does it do?

The suspension maintains the relationship between the wheels and the frame or unibody. The suspension system interacts with the steering system to provide vehicle control. When working properly, the suspension system helps absorb the energy from road irregularities such as potholes and helps to maintain vehicle stability. The steering system transmits your input from the steering wheel to the steering gear and other steering components to control the car’s direction.

Typical Wear and Tear

Over time, steering and suspension components wear out and require replacement. Regular checks are critical to maintain a safe car. Factors that affect wear include:

• Driving habits

• Operating conditions

• Vehicle type

• Type of steering and suspension system

• Frequency of regular maintenance such as chassis lubrication and wheel alignment

Symptoms

• Pulling

• Uneven tire wear

• Noise and vibration while cornering

• Loss of control

Steering Source – Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org/suspension

 

TRANSMISSION

What is it?

The transmission works with the engine to provide power to you car’s wheels. Whether automatic or manual, the transmission plays a major role in the overall dependability of your car. Make sure to check it at the first sign of problems.

What does it do?

A transmission/transaxle keeps the engine’s output optimally matched to the speed and load conditions. The torque converter, connected to the automatic transmission/transaxle input shaft, connects, multiplies and interrupts the flow of engine torque into the transmission. Universal joints connect to the driveshaft to transmit output power from the transmission to the rear axle on rear-wheel-drive cars. Universal joints also allow the driveshaft to work at an angle. Automatic transmission fluid serves a multitude of purposes. It cleans, cools, lubricates, transmits force, transmits pressure, inhibits varnish buildup and continually protects the transmission. There are several different types of automatic transmission fluid. Reference your owner’s manual for how they should be used.

Typical Wear and Tear

Wear and tear on the transmission can be influenced by:

• Driving habits

• Towing or excessive loads

• Operating conditions

• Condition of the transmission fluid

• Frequency of regular maintenance

Symptoms

• Slipping

• Hesitation

• Bucking

• Grinding gears

• Difficulty shifting

Source – Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org

MAINTENANCE SERVICES

 

BELTS AND HOSES

Many experts urge replacing belts, radiator and heater hoses at specific recommended intervals to prevent your car from breaking down. Losing a belt today can mean big trouble for the engine because serpentine belts are used on most engines to turn the water pump, alternator, power steering and air-conditioning compressor. If the belt snaps, everything is lost and you may be stranded. Older cars use individual V-belts for these various accessories. A blown hose could result in an overheated engine and can cause additional engine damage.

What is it?

You car’s belts and hoses are essential to the cooling, air conditioning and charging systems, and the engine. Don’t take these routine replacement intervals for granted because they can break down and leave you stranded.

What does it do?

The timing belt keeps the crankshaft and camshaft mechanically synchronized to maintain engine timing. Whether serpentine, V-belt or fan belt (the belts on the outside of the engine), they all transmit power from the front of the engine to accessories that need to be driven, such as the air conditioning, the charging system and fans. Radiator and heat hoses carry coolant to and from the engine, radiator and heater core.

Why Do I Need This Service?

It’s not easy to know the true condition of a belt or hose by its outward appearance, because most belts and hoses fail from the inside out. Rubber hoses can become hard and brittle, deteriorating with age and exposure to heat, causing the hose to split, blister or leak. Belts also break down with heat, mileage and age. Every time a belt passes around a pulley, it bends. Flexing produces heat that causes the rubber to harden over time. In addition, if the belt is loose or slips, the wear process can be accelerated.

Typical Wear and Tear

Key items that affect the replacement interval for belts and hoses:

• Vehicle age

• Electrolytic corrosion

• Mileage

• Oil contamination

• Belt tension

• Failed hose clamps

Symptoms

• Squeaking noise from under the hood during start-up or operation

• Coolant leaks

• Dashboard light will illuminate

Typical Service

• Hoses should be checked at each oil change for age hardening (or softening) by pinching. Any hose that feels rock hard or mushy is due for replacement. Leaking, visible cracks, blistering or any other visible damage on the outside of the hose would also indicate a need for replacement.

• The clamps should be replaced when new hoses are installed.

• V-belts should be replaced when new hoses are installed.

• V-belts and serpentine belts should be checked for looseness.

• Replace the timing belt between 60,000 and 90,000 miles, or based on the interval specified in the owner’s manual.

Questions to Ask

• What’s the difference between a V-belt and a serpentine belt?

• Why does my aftermarket V-belt have notches?

• What are branched hoses and why might these be better for my vehicle?

• What is electrolytic corrosion and how did it get in my cooling system?

Are you aware? According to a recent survey, nearly one-third of all cars and light trucks have belts or hoses that should probably be replaced.

Belts and Hoses Source– Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org/belts

 

CABIN AIR FILTER

What is it?

A filter used to clean incoming air for the car’s HVAC system. Introduced in European vehicles, cabin air filters are now becoming common on more domestic and Asian makes and models. Some examples include the Ford Taurus, Contour, Windstar and Ford trucks; the Chevrolet Impala, Monte Carlo, Suburban, Tahoe and Silverado; and the Lincoln Navigator. Japanese cars such as the Honda Accord and Odyssey, and the Acura RL and TL use cabin filters. To date, approximately 40% of cars have cabin air filters, but the number grows each year.

What does it do?

The cabin air filter helps trap pollen, bacteria, dust, and exhaust gases that may find their way into a vehicle’s ventilation system, making the interior of the car a healthier place.

Maintenance Tips/Suggestions

Cabin air filters should be replaced according to owners’ manual guidelines, usually every 15,000 miles. It’s not uncommon, however, for cabin air filter replacement to be overlooked in the owner’s manual. Do not try to clean this filter and reinstall it. For best results, consult filter manufacturer application charts to see if your car is listed. Most filters are accessible through an access panel in the HVAC housing, which may be under the hood or in the interior of the car. Some filters require basic hand tools to remove and install the filter; others just require your hands. If neglected, a restricted cabin air filter can impair airflow in the HVAC system, possibly causing interior heating and cooling problems.

Cabin Air Filter Source– Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org/cabin_air_filter

 

FUEL ECONOMY

Fuel economy is the number of miles/kilometers per gallon your car gets and this can vary depending on how you maintain and drive your vehicle. Low tire pressure, a clogged air filter, worn or fouled spark plugs can lower gas mileage – as much as 33 percent on the highway and five percent on city streets – as does excessive idling, driving over the speed limit and using the car’s A/C system.

Why Do I Need The Service?

A properly maintained vehicle can improve it’s efficiency and save you money. Things to consider:

• Tires can lose pressure due to seasonal temperature changes and prevent your vehicle from getting maximum performance and mileage.

• Air filters can become clogged with dirt, dust or bugs, which choke off the air and create a “rich” mixture that wastes gas and causes the engine to lose power.

• Worn or fouled spark plugs can cause the engine to lose power or misfire and waste fuel.

Typical Service

• Tire pressure should be checked at least monthly, including the spare. Underinflated tires can lead to higher fuel costs by as much as three to five cents per gallon.

• The air filter should be inspected at each oil change, which is recommended every 3,000 miles or per the owner’s manual, and replaced when dirty, torn, water or oil soaked. Replacing a clogged filter can improve gas mileage by as much as 10 percent.

• A routine tune-up will include checking the spark plugs, which have a replacement interval ranging from 30,000 to 100,000 miles or per the owner’s manual, replacing any other ignition system and/or emission system parts that may be needed, replacing the fuel and air filters, adjusting the ignition timing and idle speeds (if applicable), and ensuring the onboard computer control system is working properly. A tune-up can improve gas mileage by an average of four percent.

• Oil and the oil filter should be changed every 3,000 miles or as recommended in the owner’s manual.

Questions to Ask

• My car is getting lower gas mileage than normal. Does this mean there’s a problem?

• How often should my car have a tune-up?

• What components will you be inspecting and/or replacing as part of my tune-up?

• Are my tires properly inflated and is there enough tread for safe/efficient performance?

Source– Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org

 

FUEL FILTER

What is it?

The typical fuel filter for most fuel-injected cars consists of a high-pressure canister filled with filtering media. Filters may have clamped, threaded or special fittings to ensure reliable connection to the fuel system. Filters for carbureted engines may be located at the inlet of the carburetor or inline. Filters for carbureted engines do not need to withstand the same pressures as those for fuel-injected engines.

What does it do?

Fuel filters trap harmful contaminants that may cause problems with carburetors and intricate fuel injectors. Fuel filters for carbureted engines only clean the fuel before it enters the float bowl. Injection filters, on the other hand, clean the fuel whenever the fuel pump runs (unless the fuel injection system is a “returnless” design). Fuel moves continuously up the supply side, through the filter to the fuel rail or throttle body. The fuel that doesn’t make it into the engine returns to the tank and the whole process starts over again. With a full tank of gas, the filter may clean the volume of fuel in the tank many times before it’s all used.

Maintenance Tips/Suggestions

On carbureted cars, replace the filter once a year. On cars with fuel injection, some carmakers don’t recommend replacing the filter at all during the first 100,000 miles of “normal” driving. Since “normal” usually constitutes severe driving because of less than normal conditions, it’s best to replace the filter every two years or 24,000 miles. A contaminated filter can restrict fuel flow from your car’s electric fuel pump, eventually taking a toll on its life. Frequent filter replacements remove all doubt about whether the filter may cause other problems down the road. Most filters on domestic cars and trucks hide underneath on the frame or body. Just the opposite is true on the imports. They usually put their filters somewhere in the engine compartment. If you decide to change the filter yourself, be careful. Fuel injection systems maintain pressure in the lines that must be relieved prior to filter replacement. Don’t forget that gasoline is extremely flammable. Procedures vary for relieving pressure. Also, some filters require special tools to replace the fuel filter. Because of these technicalities and because of most filter locations, it’s best to have your car’s fuel filter replaced by a qualified service professional.

Source– Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org/fuel_filter


 

FUEL SYSTEM

What is it?

You car’s fuel system works with the rest of the engine control system to deliver the best performance with the lowest emissions. Check your car’s fuel system regularly or immediately if you smell gas or suspect a problem.

What does it do?

The fuel system transfers fuel from the fuel tank and passes it through a fuel filter for cleaning before it arrives at the injectors. A pressure regulator controls fuel pressure to ensure good engine performance under a variety of speed and load conditions. Fuel injectors, when activated, spray a metered amount of fuel into the engine. Some vehicles use a return line system to return unused fuel back to the tank.

Typical Wear and Tear

Intervals for fuel system maintenance may be influenced by:

• Fuel quality

• Vehicle age

• Mileage

• Operating conditions

• Maintenance history

Symptoms

• Clogged or worn fuel injectors

• Poor fuel economy

• Vehicle won’t start

• “Check Engine” light is illuminated

Source– Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org


 

LIGHTING AND WIPERS

What is it?

Lights and wipers play a major role in safe driving – the chances for accidents increase if you can’t see or be seen. Some states have laws that require the headlights to be on with the wipers. If you detect any problems with your car’s lights or wipers, have them checked out at once.

What does it do?

The wiper system keeps excessive water, snow or dirt from building up on the windshield and removes them to maintain clear visibility through the windshield. The lighting system provides nighttime visibility, signals and alerts other drivers, and supplies light for viewing instruments and the vehicle’s interior.

Typical Wear and Tear

Lights and wipers are normal wear items that require periodic replacement. Factors affecting replacement intervals include:

• Operating conditions (winter conditions are tough on wiper blades)

• Frequency of use

• Material and type of lights and wipers

• Sunny weather – wiper blades can deteriorate faster and need more frequent replacement in desert states

Symptoms

• Chattering or streaking wiper

• Rapid signal blinking

• Dimming lights

Source – Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org/wiper_blades


 

OIL CHANGE & FILTER

Critical parts of your engine are lubricated, cleaned and cooled by your car’s oil and filter. Other specifically formulated fluids are used for the operation and protection of systems and components such as brakes, cooling, power steering, automatic and manual transmissions, and transfer cases. Your car may also be equipped with a variety of filters including those for the transmission, fuel system and interior ventilation.

What is it?

Your car’s filters are important to the longevity of your car and interior comfort. Maximize your car investment by replacing filters regularly.

What does it do?

The oil filter traps contaminants, allowing the oil to flow through the engine unrestricted. The fuel filter separates harmful contaminants that may cause problems with carburetors or intricate fuel injectors. The air filter traps dirt particles, which can cause damage to engine cylinders, walls, pistons and piston rings. The air filter also plays a role in keeping contaminants off the airflow sensor (in fuel-injected cars). The cabin filter helps trap pollen, bacteria, dust and exhaust gases that may find their way into a car’s ventilation system.

Why Do I Need This Service?

Periodic oil and filter changes help keep your engine clean on the inside. Dust, metallic shavings, condensation and even antifreeze can contaminate motor oil. Additives, which break down over time, are also subject to contamination.

Typical Wear and Tear

Filters are normal wear items that require regular checks and replacement. Factors that affect replacement intervals include:

• Mileage

• Driving habits

• Driving and road conditions

• Type of filter

• Vehicle type

Symptoms

• Poor gas mileage

• Hesitation while accelerating

• Musty odor in the cabin

Typical Service

• Change oil and filter every 3,000 miles or three months.

• Many car manufacturers recommend extended oil drain intervals for some drivers.

• If you regularly make short trips in your car, drive in stop-and-go traffic, idle for extended periods, drive in dusty or dirty air conditions, tow a trailer of live in a cold-weather region – stay with the 3,000 mile/three-month schedule.

• For automatic transmissions, brakes, power steering and axles, vehicle-specific fluids should be used.

• Coolant should be changed every two years or 24,000 miles on cars with ethylene glycol antifreeze. Extended life coolants require less frequent change.

Questions to Ask

• What fluids will you be checking?

• Is the oil you’re putting in my car the right type for the way I drive?

• Is an oil filter change included with this service?

• When should I get my next oil change?

• Which fluid should I change next?

• How often should my fluid levels be checked?

• Will my car’s instrument panel alert me if fluids are low?

Are you aware? Regular oil changes are your best investment toward the longevity of your engine!

Source – Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org


 

TIRE SERVICE

Typical Service

• Check inflation pressure at least once a month (including the spare).

• Have the tires rotated every 6,000 miles.

• Rotation time also serves as a good opportunity to have the tires balanced. Unbalanced wheels can cause rapid wear of shock absorbers and struts, and wheel balance can change as a result of normal tire wear. On full-time four-wheel drive vehicles, a difference of only ¼ inch between the outside circumference of the front and rear tires can cause expensive damage to the transfer case or center differential. Rotating the tires to keep their sizes equal is critical on these vehicles, and replacing all four tires at the same time, rather than just the front or rear tires, is highly recommended.

• Uneven or accelerated tire wear may indicate an alignment problem. Have your car’s alignment checked at least once a year.

Questions to Ask

• What type of tires should go on my vehicle based on my driving?

• What can happen if I install a set of tires having a size not recommended for my car?

• My car shakes at certain speeds. . . what causes this?

• Do they have to replaced in pairs?

Are you aware? Proper tire inflation can improve gas mileage by more than 3% when maintained regularly.

Source – Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org


 

TUNE-UP

A proper and routine tune-up allows your engine to work hand-in-hand with the rest of your car’s powertrain. This is how optimum car performance is achieved.

Why Do I Need This Service?

A well-tuned engine delivers the best balance of power and fuel economy and produces the lowest level of emissions. Modern engines compensate for worn parts to a degree, giving you the sense of that everything is fine with your car. A routine tune-up will restore your car to its normal operating state, and contribute to the overall efficiency of the engine and emissions system.

Typical Service

• Based on spark plug type, the replacement interval can range from 30,000 to 100,000 miles.

• Replace any other ignition system and/or emissions system parts that may be needed or recommended.

• Replace the fuel and air filters.

• Adjust ignition timing and idle speeds (if applicable).

• -Ensure the onboard computer control system is working properly.

Questions to Ask

• How often does my car need a tune-up?

• Are there other services that need to be performed at this time?

• How does this work address my complaint?

• If the “Check Engine” or “Service Engine Soon” light comes on, is it the same as saying it’s time for a tune-up?

Are you aware? Routine tune-ups and engine performance checks can be your assurance of good performance and fuel economy. A healthy running engine maximizes the life of expensive emission system components

Source– Car Care Council: http://www.carcare.org